Skin arthritis

Be the One Who Helps End Arthritis. Now imagine the closest doctor that can help skin arthritis 100 miles away. It’s 500 miles door to door.

Mason was first diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at age 3. Mason’s health because of the overwhelming costs. With your financial support we’ll make a difference. WebMD explains the itchy, red, scaly skin condition called psoriasis and who is likely to get it. Symptoms, causes, and treatments are covered with pictures. Responsive Channel Content 3 Column Template_091e9c5e813ec926_tmodules_css_535. Turmeric: Health Remedy in Your Spice Rack?

Why Are Women Still Dying From Childbirth? This skin condition causes a thick, patchy, red rash with silvery, white scales. The most common type is called plaque psoriasis. You can get it anywhere, but it shows up most often on your scalp, elbows, knees, and lower back. You can’t catch it by touching the skin of someone who’s got it. Kids can get psoriasis, but it’s more common in adults.

When psoriasis starts, you may see a few red bumps on your skin. These may get larger and thicker, and then get scales on top. The patches may join together and cover large parts of your body. Your rash can be itchy and uncomfortable, and it may bleed easily if you rub or pick it. Up to half of people with skin plaques have psoriasis of the nails as well. This makes your nails look yellowish-red. Your nails may also crumble, become pitted, or get grooved lines.

Nearly everyone with psoriasis of the nails also has psoriasis somewhere on the skin. Some people with psoriasis may get psoriatic arthritis. It causes swelling and pain in your joints and can make it hard to use them for everyday tasks. You can get psoriatic arthritis at any age, but it’s most common between 30 and 50. Scientists aren’t sure exactly what causes psoriasis, but it’s linked to a problem with your immune system, your body’s defense against germs.

If you have psoriasis, your immune system mistakenly attacks healthy skin cells, as if it were fighting an infection. Your body responds by making new skin cells every few days instead of the usual 4 weeks. Those new skin cells build up on your body’s surface and form a rash. You may find your condition flares up at certain times. It’s natural to wonder if psoriasis will affect your social life. It’s important to keep your skin condition from hurting your self-esteem, though. Don’t avoid dates, social events, or job interviews.

If you feel like you’re getting depressed, talk to your doctor or a counselor. Your doctor can usually diagnose psoriasis by checking your skin, scalp, and nails. He might need to take a sample of your skin cells and look at them under a microscope to confirm the diagnosis. If you have swelling and pain in your joints, your doctor may also order blood tests and X-rays to check for arthritis. If you have mild to moderate psoriasis, you may get some relief from skin creams. They can reduce inflammation, itching, and cut the rate of skin cell growth.

Tar shampoos are helpful for psoriasis of the scalp. If you have moderate to severe psoriasis, UVB phototherapy may help. This treats the skin with exposure to ultraviolet light. It’s done at your doctor’s office or at home using a light device. PUVA is a form of phototherapy that combines a medicine called psoralen with UVA light. UVB phototherapy can help clear up psoriasis. Side effects include headache, nausea, and fatigue.

Either treatment may lead to skin cancer. Lasers are a new twist on phototherapy. They send out highly focused beams of light. This lets doctors aim the treatment directly at your rash without hitting healthy skin. Laser therapy may have fewer side effects and a smaller risk of skin cancer compared to traditional phototherapy. Your doctor may also suggest medicine that you take as a pill that targets your immune system.