Psoriatic rheumatoid arthritis

Information on psoriatic arthritis for patients and caregivers: psoriatic rheumatoid arthritis it is, common causes, getting diagnosed, treatment options and tips for managing it. 2017 American College of Rheumatology. Explore available award and grant opportunities! Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic arthritis.

In some people, it is mild, with just occasional flare ups. In other people, it is continuous and can cause joint damage if it is not treated. Early diagnosis is important to avoid damage to joints. Psoriatic arthritis typically occurs in people with skin psoriasis, but it can occur in people without skin psoriasis, particularly in those who have relatives with psoriasis.

Psoriatic arthritis typically affects the large joints, especially those of the lower extremities, distal joints of the fingers and toes, and also can affect the back and sacroiliac joints of the pelvis. For most people, appropriate treatments will relieve pain, protect the joints, and maintain mobility. Physical activity helps maintain joint movement. Psoriatic arthritis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in some patients with psoriasis.

This particular arthritis can affect any joint in the body, and symptoms vary from person to person. Research has shown that persistent inflammation from psoriatic arthritis can lead to joint damage. Fortunately, available treatments for are effective for most people. Psoriatic arthritis usually appears in people between the ages of 30 to 50, but can begin as early as childhood. Men and women are equally at risk.