Natural treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

Effective All-Natural Treatments for Arthritis — Dr. Arthritis causes discomfort natural treatment for rheumatoid arthritis pain and makes everyday tasks difficult. Thankfully, there are natural treatments for arthritis to ease the pain.

With osteoarthritis, one thing you can be sure of is there is discomfort and pain. Do you or someone you know have this sometimes debilitating disease? Natural Treatments for Arthritis — Dr. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 50 million Americans now suffer from arthritis. That equates to one in five people over 18 having some form of arthritis!

Arthritis is characterized by stiff, aching, hard to move joints and bones. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage between bones and joints wears down, allowing bones to rub together rather than giving them the protection and cushion they need. Cartilage covers the ends of bones where they meet the joints — and deterioration over time can affect the shape and functionality of the joints, making it painful and difficult to carry out everyday tasks. Apart from nagging pain and loss of mobility, arthritis can also cause various complications. And unfortunately, most conventional treatments for arthritis don’t address its underlying causes — plus they can cause dependency long term and pose many side effects. Many people who formerly suffered with osteoarthritis claim to have finally found relief naturally through adjusting their diets, lifestyles and approaches to managing pain.

Here are the top seven natural treatments for arthritis. Additional body fat strains joints, but accumulated fat itself can also cause problems to joints that are already sensitive and partially damaged. Fat does more than just sit on your body — it’s also an active tissue that creates and releases hormones and chemicals. Some of these promote inflammation and can contribute to worsening arthritis all over your body. Adipose tissue, once considered a passive storage portal of energy, is now recognized as a highly metabolic endocrine organ with the capacity to secrete active agents including adipocytokines, such as leptin, resistin and adiponectin. Over the past decade, interest in these adipocytokines has quickly become an area of intense study with respect to osteoarthritis based on evidence that they may play an important role in cartilage homeostasis and because of their emerging potential as therapeutic targets.

Case in point: Some overweight or obese patients have arthritis in parts of their bodies such as their hands, which obviously don’t support much extra body weight but are still impacted by the negative effects of inflammation. An increase in stored fat cells can speed up the rate at which joints break down, especially in people who have other risk factors for arthritis. This means it’s important to try and maintain a healthy weight by eating an unprocessed, nutrient-dense diet, reducing stress and staying active. Omega-3s are powerful at lowering inflammation and also have other benefits. Other sources include grass-fed beef, flaxseeds, chia seeds and walnuts, which are all great choices.